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Apr 06, 2022
In Welcome to the Food Forum
But it was the Starbucks' identity that its millions of customers were happily waiting fifteen minutes in line for. The infamous Starbucks cup rapidly became associated with wealth, leisure, high standards, and urbanites. From college freshman to corporate CEO's, people couldn't get enough. Starbucks enforced its marketing strategy through clever, email list catchy campaigns, a genuine and human "front line" at the store level, and for the most part, acknowledging any mistakes or shortfalls that it might've run into. All of these actions are traits, portraying a deeply rooted culture that is exuded from top to bottom of the Starbucks hierarchy. And, love 'em or hate 'em, there's no denying their great success, even in a strained economy. Marketing Strategy v. The Economy The economy is an incredibly sensitive subject around the globe. What we've also noticed is that a lot of companies and business owners are using a depressed economic state as a reason (and in some cases, an excuse) for the shortcomings in their business. For example, a big trend recently has been layoffs. Larger corporations are using weak economies as a reason to purge its staff and cut positions, when it knows just as well that that's exactly the opposite of what needs to happen. Or does it? It's become hard to tell. Is surviving a "depression" really as simple as, say, reassessing your marketing strategy? While an unstable economy is troubling, risky, and unpredictable, it's also an excellent test of the flexibility of your marketing strategy.
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